Grant Proposals

Anybody who has looked into the possibility of getting a before will know that there are two distinct types of application. The first is a application concerning funding for undergraduate degrees. For example, an individual coming from a family 200% below the poverty line will most likely attempt to obtain a to make life a little easier whilst attending college. In this instance, the student will most likely be sent a form to fill in asking for the annual income, personal details, dependent details, a quick summary of what the student intends to study an other similar information. This is pretty straightforward and requires very little effort because the federal government education department will do the calculations for you. You are not asking for a specific amount of money, just a little help.

The other king of grant proposal and application is at the opposite end of the spectrum to a hardship grant. These are usually requested by individual students, or those intending to be students to fund research or invention. Certain schools and colleges accept certain grant proposals for different things, for example, one college may accept an application for an archaeological dig, whereas another may only look at scientific research and inventions. This is of course down to the discretion of the school and the size of the budget. If you do happen to be a Masters or PhD student and want to make a difference, then you can apply for a grant, but you would have to make it unique so that it catches the eye of the individual in charge of and stands a better chance of approval.

To help your grant proposal stand out from the crowd then always remember to do the following:

* Include a comprehensive research proposal – This must be in plain English with a little jargon for effective, but easy to understand and laid out really well so that the professor will not scan the first page and throw it away. If it is cluttered or messy, or even too long, then he will. 6 pages, no more and no less, double spaced and in 12 point font is the standards layout, but do not use a fancy font because it will look as though you are trying to make up for something.
* Put forward a well-reasoned and logical argument – never back track or try to argue against yourself because you will seem uncertain of what it is that you are trying to discover. Make sure the aims are clearly defined, preferably in bullet points, and demonstrate that you have already started basic research.
* Plan out your time – Break your work down into manageable sections that show you have thought out what it is you are to do and have set reasonable goals. When you get to the analysis and fieldwork, make sure that it is clear how you will reach your conclusion and highlight any unique issues that you expect to come up during your investigation and analysis.
* Include the extra material that gives you credibility as a researcher – This should include a recommendation from a respected member of the faculty who will supervise your throughout. He or she should clearly state how they will become involved, what his or her function is and exactly how much of the workload her or she will be taking on. You should also include a resume for yourself, which should be no more than two pages long.
* Finally, the all-important budget – lay out your sums effectively so they show that some thought has gone into them. You will have covered all angles and probable costs, even those that it may take to get your research back on track if something goes wrong. This is the one page that most grant applicants for get to include. It need only be a side of A4, but enough to show the college just how committed you are!
* Finally, never ever try to jazz the proposal up too much because it will look as if a monkey completed it! Make sure that it is all your own work and is delivered in the traditional, plenty of white paper layout! This will impress them more because it shows professionalism, and thus it will appeal to them!

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